Corrine Barraclough

27 August 2020

5:18 PM

“The important thing is not to stop questioning,” said Albert Einstein.

Can we please apply this simple logic to the religion of feminism, which has re-wired human beings to question precisely nothing?

You may not expect much sense from Larissa Waters, deputy leader of the Greens. But, even if your expectations are incredibly low, you should be shocked by this ridiculous post on her social media feed.

“Spent most of today dialling in to the Family Law Inquiry (you know, the one co-chaired by Pauline Hanson, who thinks that women make up allegations of domestic violence to get better outcomes),” she wrote on Facebook.

She wrote a lot more, but let’s take a moment to analyse this sentence.

In what world is it acceptable for the deputy of any political party to mock another woman for speaking truth?

Why on earth does Waters think that women are incapable of making up allegations?

Are women not human beings?

Are they not capable of wrongdoing, just like men?

Are they not equally capable of being selfishly motivated?

Of course they are.

Waters goes on to blab about “dedicated experts”, “calls for more funding” (what a surprise) and calls for targeted support for “First Nations and culturally and linguistically diverse families”.

How about experts who speak the truth?

How about funding for fathers desperately fighting to see their beloved children?

How about experts with even a vague interest of seeing justice in family law rather than this shallow, pathetic gender bias?

If you doubt that women make up allegations, you’re living in a fantasyland.

Wake up Waters, you’re a disgrace.

Comments like this underline why so many are losing all faith in this inquiry actually getting to the truth, let alone creating the change the family law system so urgently requires.

Corrine Barraclough has a new weekly online show hosted on Good Sauce which will focus on family law, its impact on mental health, and the damage of the gender-bias in mainstream media.

 

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